Agave Nectar and Fructose Are Evil

star_wars_phantom_menace_sith2Yes, agave nectar and fructose are strong with the dark side of the force.  Last week, I posted a tweet that said ”fructose is poison”, and small group of people disagreed with me, and asked me to provide how much is safe, and proof of why I think it is poison.  One of them suggested that I’m a “Lustig Devotee”, but I don’t even know Lustig, so no, I’m not a devotee.  So here’s my reasoning about why agave nectar and fructose are evil, mostly agave nectar actually.

First, I should explain why some people think that agave nectar is good for diabetics (that’s the evil part).  The agave nectar companies as well as many raw food activists swear by this stuff, and they do their very best to convince us that it’s healthy for us.  They say it’s good for diabetics because it doesn’t raise your blood sugar much.  It’s true that it doesn’t raise blood sugar much, but it’s not true that it’s good for diabetics.  I’ll get to that in a moment.  The important thing to know about agave nectar is that it’s 90% fructose.

So if it doesn’t raise your blood sugar, or cause an insulin release, what happens to it?  Fructose cannot be processed into energy by your muscles.  Instead it’s processed by your liver, and turned into fat to be stored in your fat cells, to be converted into energy at a later time.  They’re actually called triglycerides.  Wait a minute.  Your liver turns all that fructose into triglycerides?  You know, the stuff that’s stored in your fat cells, and that raises your risk of heart disease, as if your risk isn’t high enough having diabetes?!  Yeah, that stuff!  Now, imagine using agave nectar as a sweetener in everything, replacing your household sweeteners with it.  Madhava-Organic-Agave-Nectar-Light-235-oz(Remember, it’s 90% fructose!)  This is what the marketing companies want you to do.  To buy agave nectar as your primary household sweetener, because it’s a “healthy alternative”.  Christ!  Every time I hear that I want to scream.  The marketing companies that market agave nectar want you to believe it’s good for your diabetes and instead it could kill you.  You’re trading a short term health benefit, no blood sugar spike, for a long term health risk, heart attack resulting in death.  I have experience in death, so please excuse me for being a little dramatic, but I want to stop you from having to go through that.  It sucks big time!  When they checked my cholesterol in the hospital after my cardiac arrest, my triglycerides were 289 I think, and my HDL was 29.  That’s the exact recipe for heart disease.  I had heart disease, and the first symptom was cardiac arrest!  If high quantities of fructose in agave nectar can add to your triglycerides, wouldn’t you want to discontinue use of it, or never even try it?  You’re already at risk because you have diabetes.

So how much is safe?  I have no flippin’ clue, and no scientist or medical professional will give you a straight answer to that question anyway.  All I know, is that I prefer sweeteners that don’t make friends with you like Senator Palpatine, only to try to kill you later as the Emperer.  Yes, fructose is in many other whole foods in natural form, but those foods aren’t 90% fructose.  It’s that 90% part that I’m going to protect myself from.  It’s like PURE FRUCTOSE and PURE EVIL.  No thank you!!!  So that’s why I called fructose poison in my tweet, but I should have been more specific and called agave nectar poison, because that’s what is truly evil.  The fact that it’s touted as a healthy alternative for diabetics, when it’s just as bad for you as sugar is.

 

********** Now ya know, and knowing is half the battle.  Go Joe!!! **********

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10 thoughts on “Agave Nectar and Fructose Are Evil

  1. >Fructose cannot be processed into energy by your muscles. Instead it’s processed by your liver, and turned into fat to be stored in your fat cells,So how much is safe? I have no flippin’ clue, and no scientist or medical professional will give you a straight answer to that question anyway.<

    Again I would refer you to the actual research and this review paper

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/35/7/1611.short

    and here is a lay article which discusses the science and links to other articles

    http://evolvinghealthscience.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/sievenpiper-fructose-should-not-worry.html

    If you really are interested in fructose science, check out the videos within the following article – you will see many scientists calling out Dr Lustig for overstating the evidence and poorly extrapolating animal models (Q and A is the best section for that).

    http://evolvinghealthscience.blogspot.com.au/2012/04/sugar-showdown-science-responds-to.html

  2. Thanks for your comment and links David, but I don’t think you understood what my article was about? Heart disease risk caused by high triglyceride levels if you use agave nectar as your primary sweetener, since it’s 90% FRUCTOSE. None of those links says fructose doesn’t raise triglyceride levels. Show me studies that prove that it doesn’t, and I’ll shut up and stop preaching.

  3. “Fructose cannot be processed into energy by your muscles. Instead it’s processed by your liver, and turned into fat to be stored in your fat cells”

    What evidence do you have to support this? This all or nothing approach is typical of David Gillespie and NOT supported by the evidence. Start with these review and study:

    http://physrev.physiology.org/content/90/1/23.full.pdf+html
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3533803/pdf/1743-7075-9-89.pdf

    and here is a lay article summarising the current data

    http://evolvinghealthscience.blogspot.com.au/2012/05/fate-of-fructose-interview-with-dr-john.html

    “So how much is safe? I have no flippin’ clue, and no scientist or medical professional will give you a straight answer to that question anyway”

    Again I would refer you to the actual research and this review paper

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/35/7/1611.short

    and here is a lay article which discusses the science and links to other articles

    http://evolvinghealthscience.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/sievenpiper-fructose-should-not-worry.html

    If you really are interested in fructose science, check out the videos within the following article – you will see many scientists calling out Dr Lustig for overstating the evidence and poorly extrapolating animal models (Q and A is the best section for that).

    http://evolvinghealthscience.blogspot.com.au/2012/04/sugar-showdown-science-responds-to.html

  4. First, I want to thank you for presenting me with science and studies. Very much appreciated. You’ve made me have a shadow of a doubt, but . . . . .

    Ok, so I’ve read everything (as best I could as I’m no scientist, and these are full of terms I either don’t, or barely understand), and even these links keep saying that they “don’t see harm in small doses”. Well agave nectar is a LARGE DOSE. They keep talking about balance, and how fructose isn’t going to harm anyone if you keep its consumption in balance with other sugars. Agave nectar is NOT BALANCE. Even these scientists won’t say it’s not harmful in large doses. What all these links tell me, is that no one really knows what large doses will do to you, so I’m gonna stick to avoiding it. Ya know, there’s 1 person that’s lived longer with type 1 diabetes than anyone I’ve ever heard of. You know who I’m gonna say? Dr. Richard Bernstein. He’s been type 1 for 67 years, and he hasn’t eaten fruit in 42 years.

  5. Agave nectar or syrup is around 19% water. How can you get 90% fructose from that? It also contains some glucose, which is another reason that it can’t be 90% fructose. If you examine carbohydrate analyses of the syrups, you will find some with around 50% fructose and some as high as about 72%, but none with 90%. If you can find one with that much fructose, you would also find it nearly impossible to pour. Why would anyone claim that much fructose? The most likely reason, apart from attempting to create controversy and gain page-views, is that are reading values based on analyses of the syrups with all their water removed, or what are know as dry weight measurements. Obviously, that’s not the syrup sold in stores.

    As for large doses, they were never suggested or needed to sweeten. At 1.5 times the sweetness of sucrose or table sugar, the advantage of using the syrups is that less sugar is consumed.

  6. so what should we be using instead? just a little splenda? get used to no sugar at all? Occasional glucose matched with insulin?

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